The Acosta Tribe

26 Mar

Crisanto Acosta and Juana Juliana Carnero had seventeen children.

I find it amazing that during a time of danger from Indian attacks, during periods of near starvation and numerous epidemics, fourteen of the children made it to adulthood.  One of the offspring (Victoriana) was my grandfather Esteban’s mother, thus my great-grandmother.

During my travels I connected with descendants of Cecilia, Matilde, and Toribio.

I am still looking  to connect with the descendants of Faustina who married a Hinojos. I am also searching for Juan, Jose & Lucia Dominguez; Facundo & Gregoria Zamora; Maximo & Marcelina Hinojos; Zapopam & Gregorio Jaquez; and Ponciano & Anastacia Lugo.

The Acostas are most prolific in Texas, and although they are now scattered from coast to coast, I still hold on to the hope of connecting with my primos of this line. If you have any information that would assist me in my search, please leave a comment or e-mail me at:  primaelisa@yahoo.com.

Thanks for visiting.  Please check back from time to time for updates and additional posts.

Elisa

3 Responses to “The Acosta Tribe”

  1. Jerry Lujan May 3, 2010 at 7:22 PM #

    I just subscribed to Prima Elisa’s blog. The first thing I found was a posting related to the Porvenir Massacre. Ironically, I was just researching that last week, so I could share that piece of history with my son, Jerry Lujan, Jr. What prompted me to research that was due to a story that my mother’s ( Consuelo Lujan, 94, wife of the Late Frank Lujan) uncle, Tomas Corrales told me back in the 1970s.

    It was around 1916. Tomas was just a small boy around 5 at the time. His mother (my maternal great-grandmother) and brother, Bartolo age 9, and Tomas were sent form Marfa to Candelaria on a wagon drawn by two horses. They climbed to the summit of the RimRock all day, and made camp when they reached the summit. They made a campfire and pitched a tent. It was dark and they were inside the tent, when they heard several horses arriving. Tomas’ mother reached for her pistol and rifle. One of the men on horseback yelled, “Corrales!”

    My great-grandmother replied, “Soy la esposa de el.”

    “Pues desde temprano los vi subiendo la cuesta. Conoci los caballos de Corrales.”

    At his point they went outside the tent, my great grandmother offered them coffee. The leader of the men asked if they had eaten, to which my relatives replied to the negative. With a “chiflido” the leader made, another horseman galloped to the campsite, and dumped a hind quarter of beef close to the fire. The leader took out a very sharp knife and slices severl steakes and through them on the ambers.

    Tio Tomas, recalls looking around and saw many many campfires and wondered what that was all about.

    The leader then told them that there was great danger, and that in the morning he would send some of his men to escort them into Candelaria, which they did.

    I am not sure who the leader was, but dare speculate that he was nope other than Chico Cano, because the next day, they were the ones that raided the Brite Ranch, between Valentine and Marfa. Of course, it was the raid on the Brite Ranch that precipitated the Porvenir Massacre.

    My parents were compadres with Diego and Jacinata Cano. I am not certain if Diego was a son or a nephew of Chico Cano. I do know that Diego had two sons, one Diego Jr and Tony. In my research last week, I ran across a reference to a book, “Bandido,” by Tony Cano, about his grandfather Chico. I am going to order that book.

    Along with this story, Tio Tomas said that after the Porvenir Massacre, the Villistas avenged it by lauching a frontal assault into the U.S. from Porvenir all the way to Brrownsville. I have not been able to confirm this through any documented record of events, other than the hotbed of violence (gringo/mexican) all along the border during the years of the revolution.

    Hopefully, there will be someone out there who has heard similar stories to corroborate this.

  2. Jerry Lujan May 3, 2010 at 7:34 PM #

    I just subscribed to Prima Elisa’s blog. The first thing I found was a posting related to the Porvenir Massacre. Ironically, I was just researching that last week, so I could share that piece of history with my son, Jerry Lujan, Jr. What prompted me to research that was due to a story that my mother’s ( Consuelo Lujan, 94, wife of the Late Frank Lujan) uncle, Tomas Corrales told me back in the 1970s.

    It was around 1916. Tomas was just a small boy around 5 at the time. His mother (my maternal great-grandmother) and brother, Bartolo age 9, and Tomas were sent form Marfa to Candelaria on a wagon drawn by two horses. They climbed to the summit of the RimRock all day, and made camp when they reached the summit. They made a campfire and pitched a tent. It was dark and they were inside the tent, when they heard several horses arriving. Tomas’ mother reached for her pistol and rifle. One of the men on horseback yelled, “Corrales!”

    My great-grandmother replied, “Soy la esposa de el.”

    “Pues desde temprano los vi subiendo la cuesta. Conoci los caballos de Corrales.”

    At his point they went outside the tent, my great grandmother offered them coffee. The leader of the men asked if they had eaten, to which my relatives replied to the negative. With a “chiflido” the leader made, another horseman galloped to the campsite, and dumped a hind quarter of beef close to the fire. The leader took out a very sharp knife and sliced several steaks and threw them on the ambers.

    Tio Tomas, recalls looking around and saw many many campfires and wondered what that was all about.

    The leader then told them that there was great danger, and that in the morning he would send some of his men to escort them into Candelaria, which they did.

    I am not sure who the leader was, but dare speculate that he was nope other than Chico Cano, because the next day, they were the ones that raided the Brite Ranch, between Valentine and Marfa. Of course, it was the raid on the Brite Ranch that precipitated the Porvenir Massacre.

    My parents were compadres with Diego and Jacinata Cano. I am not certain if Diego was a son or a nephew of Chico Cano. I do know that Diego had two sons, one Diego Jr and Tony. In my research last week, I ran across a reference to a book, “Bandido,” by Tony Cano, about his grandfather Chico. I am going to order that book.

    Along with this story, Tio Tomas said that after the Porvenir Massacre, the Villistas avenged it by lauching a frontal assault into the U.S. from Porvenir all the way to Brrownsville. I have not been able to confirm this through any documented record of events, other than the hotbed of violence (gringo/mexican) all along the border during the years of the revolution. According to Tio Tomas, his father was an agent of the Villistas operating out of Marfa.

    Hopefully, there will be someone out there who has heard similar stories to corroborate this.

  3. rosendo m evaro October 6, 2012 at 9:08 AM #

    I am rosendocarrasco alias rosendo evaro, I owe my life to victar carrasco and pablo evaro jr. so when I was 18 I changed my name , I was to get my highschool diploma, my ss and join the draft.I was drafted dec. 1952 basic and radar training in fort bliss tx. was in korea 1953 and 1954.

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